Friends Leave Kind Tributes to Ethan and Family After Tragic Motor Vehicle Incident


Dozens of loving tributes have been left at All Saints Academy for Ethan, one of 4 Dunstable people who tragically lost their lives last week.

Ethan, 13, his mother Tracy, 45, his brother Joshua, 11, and Tracy’s partner’s daughter Aimee Golding all died in a multi car pile-up on the A34 on Wednesday evening.

Among the messages ...

"... Will remember you and all of the good moments its not gonna be the same without you..."

" ... one of the nicest boys I've ever met ..."

"Ethan was a really nice person with a big heart, he was really funny ... "

"...I can't believe your actually gone and left our world forever, you and your family will be missed so so so much..."

"... he means so much to me I used to play dot to dot with his freckles... he would always make me smile, no one can replace him ..."

"You're in my thoughts"

"RIP Tracy, Ethan, Josh & Amy Thinking of you all and your family and friends. "

"RIP Ethan, Will miss your cheeky smile Love ..."

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Is your child affected by the loss of a friend? - Talk about it


  • Talk to your child about the tragedy in an age-appropriate way.
  • Listen, give some information and listen some more.
  • Kindle hope that the world goes on.
  • Ask your teen: “What are your pals saying?” Don’t assume they are NOT affected. Ignite their social justice. “What could we do?”
  • Plan what you’ll say to your child about the tragedy to boost their confidence and calmness. It’s OK to say “I don’t know” or “Good question. Let me find out.”

Children need to know it’s OK to share their feelings. It’s normal to be upset. Be calm and give only age appropriate information.

Don’t give more information than the child is ready to hear. More importantly, let your child know you’re there to listen.

Don’t expect to help alleviate your kid’s anxiety unless you keep your own in check.

Kids are calmer if adults are calmer.

Please don’t think because the child isn’t talking about the events that he/she didn’t hear about it.

Give the information in small doses. Listen. Watch their response.

Children need processing time. Children don’t need to know all the details and numbers. End with “I’m here for any questions you may have at anytime.”

Stick to family routines. This soothes the stress and helps children to know that despite tragedy,  the world still goes on. The sun will come up tomorrow. Hug!

Children respond to tragic news differently. Let your child know their feelings are normal. Help he/she express them. Follow his/her lead.

Tonight is the first talk. Keep ongoing dialogue. Don’t explain more than they are ready to hear. Kids process and will want more later.